ECG Guru - Instructor Resources

A gathering place for instructors of ECG and cardiac topics.

       

Subscribe to me on YouTube

Welcome to the ECG GURU

Serving ECG instructors and their students since 2011.
Download ECGs, Illustrations, and other Resources for your classes!

 

Featured App

Instructors' Collection ECG: High-grade AV Block With Bradycardia

Thu, 06/04/2020 - 14:24 -- Dawn

If you are an ECG instructor, you probably carefully choose ECGs to illustrate the topic you are teaching. One of the reasons for the existence of the ECG Guru website is our desire to provide lots of such illustrations for you to choose from.

Sometimes, though, an ECG does not clearly illustrate one specific dysrhythmia well, because the interpretation of the ECG depends on so many other factors.  In order to get it “right”, we would need to know information about the patient’s history, presentation, lab results, or previous ECGs. We might need to see the ECG done immediately before or after the one we are looking at.  Some ECG findings must ultimately be confirmed by an electrophysiology study before we can know for sure what is going on.

For those of us who are “ECG nerds”, it can be fun to debate our opinions and even more fun to hear from wiser, more advanced practitioners about their interpretations.

My belief, as a clinical instructor, is that we must teach strategies for treating the patient who has a “controversial” ECG that take into account the level of the practitioner, the care setting, and the patient’s hemodynamic status.  In some settings, it might be absolutely forbidden for a first-responder to cardiovert atrial fibrillation, for example.  But atrial fib is routinely cardioverted under controlled conditions in hospitals.  The general rule followed by emergency providers that “all wide-complex tachycardias are v tach until proven otherwise” has no doubt prevented deaths in situations where care providers did not agree on the origin of the tachycardia.

The ECG:    We do not have much patient information to go with this ECG, just that it is from a 71-year-old woman who developed severe hypotension and lost consciousness, but was revived with transcutaneous pacing.   Here is what we do know about this ECG:

·        There are regular P waves, at a rate of about 39 bpm (sinus bradycardia).

ECG Challenge: Guillain-Barre' Syndrome Patient

Mon, 06/15/2020 - 13:45 -- Dawn

This ECG is probably not for the basic ECG interpretation class.  But, it presents a challenge for the experienced ECG Gurus and instructors out there.  We will leave it here for one week, to allow for comments.  On June 22, we will publish Dr. Jerry Jones’s comments. 

The Patient      This ECG is from a 44-year-old man. He was stricken with Guillain-Barre’ Syndrome when he was 32.  He doesn’t know what his ECGs showed when he was hospitalized with GBS. He knows of no abnormal lab results except for a high CK of 414, attributed to the muscle wasting with GBS.

When he was 43, he started having occasional light-headedness, and was found to have bradycardia around 50 bpm that did not increase with exercise.  A loop recording showed occasional bradycardia over the next several years.  This ECG is now five years old, and the patient says he no longer suffers from bradycardia or lightheadedness, only occasional palpitations and a sensation of “skipped beats”. He lives an active life, albeit with some residual lower extremity weakness from the GBS.

In order to comment on this ECG, it is necessary to “sign in” with an email address.  This is so we can attempt to keep Spammers off the site.  We do not use the email addresses or share them, and we will not contact you. We are looking forward to reading your comments.

ECG Basics: Multifocal Atrial Tachycardia

Sun, 05/03/2020 - 20:22 -- Dawn

Multifocal atrial tachycardia is diagosed when an irregular atrial rhythym is over 100 beats per minute.  It is caused by multiple competing atrial pacemaker sites.  There need to be at least three different P wave morphologies to diagnose MAT.  The PR intervals may vary also.   It is nearly always seen in very sick patients, often with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and/or respiratory failure.

ECG Glossary from Dr. Ken Grauer

Sat, 06/08/2019 - 14:16 -- Dawn

Are you looking for a comprehensive ECG glossary that goes beyond simply defining words? Dr. Ken Grauer, who is the ECG Guru's Consulting Expert, has a Glossary available on his website that explains the terms.  Instructors and students alike will benefit from having this glossary readily available.  The glossary is exerpted from his e-Publication, "A 1st Book On ECGs - 2014", available on Amazon.

ECG Guru Ads - Products and Services of Interest to our Members

 If you would like to place ads for products or services of interest to our readers, please contact us at [email protected]

 

1924:  Willem Einthoven wins the Nobel prize for inventing the electrocardiograph.

All our content is FREE & COPYRIGHT FREE for non-commercial use

Please be courteous and leave any watermark or author attribution on content you reproduce.

Subscribe to ECG Guru - Instructor Resources RSS